Film Review - Black is King

This image released by Disney Plus shows Beyoncé in a scene from her visual album “Black is King,” premiering Friday on Disney Plus.

‘Black Is King’ is supreme Black art

Beyoncé’s new film takes you on a journey of Black art, music, history and fashion as the superstar transports you to Africa to tell the story of a young man in search of his crown, matched to epic songs she created while inspired by “The Lion King.”

In “Black Is King,” which debuted Friday on Disney+, Beyoncé continues to dig deep into her roots and share her discovery with the world, like she did on the sweet masterpiece “Lemonade.” Black pride is the center of the film, with African artists strongly represented, as Beyoncé shares her stage with Tiwa Savage, Wizkid, Mr Eazi, Busiswa, Salatiel, Yemi Alade, Moonchild Sanelly and more.

They add a great deal of energy and beauty to the film — through lyrical delivery, eye-popping and sharp choreography, and bright and elegant costumes — bringing the songs from “The Lion King: The Gift” to life.

That album was inspired by the time Beyoncé spent voicing the character of Nala in the latest version of “The Lion King.” Audio from the animated film are included, but it’s the newer passages that truly resonate.

“When it’s all said and done, I don’t even know my own native tongue. And if I can’t speak myself, I can’t think myself. And if I can’t think myself, I can’t be myself. And if I can’t be myself, I will never know me,” a man says. “So Uncle Sam, tell me this, if I will ever know me, how can you?”

Regis Philbin buried at Notre Dame

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Television host Regis Philbin, who died last week at 88, has been buried at the University of Notre Dame following a private funeral service at his alma mater, a school spokesman said.

Philbin was buried Wednesday at Cedar Grove Cemetery on the northern Indiana Catholic school’s campus after a private service at the school’s Basilica of the Sacred Heart.

“The Philbin family wanted to bring Regis back to the place he loved so much for a private funeral and burial. That occurred on Wednesday, and he is now resting in peace at Notre Dame,” school spokesman Dennis Brown said in an email.

The genial television host and personality graduated from Notre Dame in 1953 and was an enthusiastic alum, often returning to the South Bend campus for football games, pep rallies, banquets, concerts and other events, the South Bend Tribune reported.

In 2001, he gave $2.75 million to the school to create the Philbin Studio Theatre, meant for laboratory and performance-arts productions, at its DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.

School president the Rev. John Jenkins praised Philbin for his commitment to the school in a statement this week, saying that “Regis regaled millions on air through the years, oftentimes sharing a passionate love for his alma mater with viewers.”

Phibin died of natural causes on July 24, just over a month before his 89th birthday. He retired in 2011 following a long television career that included hosting the syndicated morning shows “Live! with Regis and Kathie Lee” from 1985-2000 — with co-host Kathie Lee Gifford — and “Live! with Regis and Kelly”— with Kelly Ripa — from 2001 until his retirement.

He had also hosted the game show “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire.”

‘Into the Wild’ bus lands at museum

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — An infamous bus appears headed to a new home at a museum in Fairbanks after being removed from Alaska’s backcountry to deter people from making dangerous, sometimes deadly treks to visit the site where a young man documented his demise in 1992.

The state Department of Natural Resources said Thursday that it intends to negotiate with the University of Alaska’s Museum of the North to display the bus, which was popularized by the book “Into the Wild” and a movie of the same name and flown from its location near Denali National Park and Preserve last month.

“Of the many expressions of interest in the bus, the proposal from the UA Museum of the North best met the conditions we at DNR had established to ensure this historical and cultural object will be preserved in a safe location where the public could experience it fully, yet safely and respectfully, and without the specter of profiteering,” Natural Resources Commissioner Corri Feige said in a statement.

The bus became a beacon for those wishing to retrace the steps of Christopher McCandless, who hiked to the bus in 1992. The 24-year-old Virginia man died from starvation when he couldn’t hike back out because of the swollen Teklanika River. He kept a journal of his ordeal, which was discovered when his body was found.

McCandless’ story became famous with author Jon Krakauer’s 1996 book “Into the Wild,” followed nine years later by director Sean Penn’s movie of the same name.

Over the years, people from around the world have traveled to the bus, located about 25 miles from the town of Healy, to pay homage to McCandless.

Two women have drowned in the Teklanika River on such visits to the bus, one from Switzerland in 2010 and the other from Belarus nine years later. There have been 15 other search-and-rescue missions since 2009, state officials said, including five Italian tourists who needed rescue last winter. One had severe frostbite.

The draw of the bus became too much for state officials, who arranged for the Alaska Army National Guard to remove the bus with a helicopter last month as part of a training mission.

The former Fairbanks city bus is sometimes called Bus 142 or the Magic Bus. It was later used to house construction workers building a road in the area. It was abandoned in 1961, and became a shelter for those using the backcountry to recreate or hunt.

The department received dozens of suggestions for use of the bus that came from individuals, museums and institutions nationwide, with varying plans to preserve, exhibit, monetize or memorialize it, Feige said.

The department decided to consider the university’s proposal, which had several advantages. It’s just one of three official state repositories, and the only one in the Fairbanks area able to accept and curate state-owned historical items. The museum also has the staff to restore, curate and display the bus.

This proposal also allows the Department of Natural Resources to retain ownership of the bus, and decide future uses, including whether to lend it out for display and where.

“I believe that giving Bus 142 a long-term home in Fairbanks at the UA Museum of the North can help preserve and tell the stories of all these people,” Feige said. “It can honor all of the lives and dreams, as well as the deaths and sorrows associated with the bus, and do so with respect and dignity.”

The department anticipates signing final paperwork within the next few months.