The majority of East Texas school districts saw improvement in the state’s A-F accountability ratings published Thursday by the Texas Education Agency.

Individual campuses also received an A-F rating this year, as opposed to the old rating of “met standard” or “improvement required.”

Last year was the state’s first year of the new A-F ratings system, and most districts followed the statewide trend this year of improving their letter rating, according to TEA.

Each of the state’s more than 1,200 districts and charter schools, as well as their individual campuses receive A-F accountability ratings from the TEA.

Ratings are comprised of data from three areas:

Student achievement, which is mostly comprised of STAAR (State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness) test scores; school progress, which shows how students perform over time and how they compare to other schools like them; and closing performance gaps, which shows how well different groups of students in a school perform.

The ratings data looks at everything from graduation rates, whether a graduate goes on to attend college, the student’s career and military readiness, individual SAT/ACT scores and students’ college prep course completion.

Each parent, educator and community member can visit https://txschools.gov/ to view any district’s or school’s report card and rating.

Marshall ISD

Marshall ISD overall increased its district rating to a “C” in 2019, up from a “D” in 2018. For its individual campus ratings, all of Marshall ISD’s campuses met the state’s minimum standards for the first time in 11 years this year.

The district’s overall grade this year jumped to 74 out of 100, up from last year’s 67. On the three points of the ratings, the district rated a “D” for student achievement, a “C” for school progress and a “D” for closing the gaps.

“We are excited that for the first time in 11 years we do not have any campuses that are rated ‘improvement required,’” Marshall ISD Superintendent Jerry Gibson said Thursday. “It shows the dedication of our teachers and campus administration.

“We are celebrating going from a ‘D’ to a ‘C’ as a district, but we are not satisfied. Our constant goal is to improve, and with that we plan to be a ‘B’ at this time next year,” he continued. “Marshall ISD has come a long way from 2016, when we had six campuses rated ‘improvement required.’

“It is very rewarding to hear so many community members offering congratulations on our success. It shows me that our community is vested and they are celebrating with us. They too have been hungry for the success we are experiencing.”

On individual campus ratings, Sam Houston Elementary School and Marshall Early Childhood Center (formerly Washington Early Childhood Center), both rated an “A.” David Crockett Elementary School, William B. Travis Elementary School and Marshall High School all rated a “C,” and Price T. Young Elementary School and Marshall Junior High School rated a “D.”

Hallsville ISD

Hallsville ISD this year rated a “B,” down from 2018’s “A” rating. The district’s grade last year was a 91 out of 100 and this year it posted an 82.

Hallsville ISD rated a “B” in both student achievement and school progress and rated a “C” in closing the gaps.

Hallsville ISD Superintendent Jeff Collum said on Thursday that the district’s new Texas Virtual Academy at Hallsville (TVAH), which serves more than 5,000 students across the state in an online setting, performed well for its first year, but they know there is room for improvement.

“We are very proud of our students and teachers as always and our rating this year overall, with our new TVAH additional 5,000 online students across the entire state of Texas, was a ‘B,’” he said. “However, our brick and mortar students continue to perform at very high levels and would have been a high ‘A,’ excluding our TVAH program.

“We will continue to monitor the new program and have already seen new ways it can be improved upon this year.”

Individually, Hallsville North Elementary School rated an “A,” while all other campuses, excluding TVAH, rated a “B” including Hallsville Intermediate School, Hallsville Primary School, Hallsville East Elementary School, Hallsville Junior High School and Hallsville High School. TVAH rated a “D.”

Harleton ISD

Harleton ISD rated an “A” this year, up from 2018’s “B” rating. Overall, the district jumped to 91 out of 100, up from 81 last year.

The district rated “A” in both student achievement and school progress and rated a “B” in closing the gaps.

“We are very pleased with our overall district rating of ‘A,’ as well as our individual campus ratings,” Harleton ISD Superintendent Brian Gray said Thursday. “This is due to the hard work of our students, staff, community and all of those involved with supporting our kiddos.

“That being said, we will always continue to look for ways to improve the educational experience on all of our campuses and within all of our programs.”

Individually, Harleton High School rated an “A” and Harleton Junior High School and Harleton Elementary School both rated a “B.”

Elysian Fields ISD

Elysian Fields ISD jumped to a “B” rating this year, up from last year’s “C” rating. Overall, the district’s score improved to 87 out of 100 this year, up from a 79 last year.

The district rated “B” across the board in all three ratings areas of student achievement, school progress and closing the gaps.

Individually, Elysian Fields High School rated a “B” and both Elysian Fields Elementary School and Elysian Fields Middle School rated a “C.”

Jefferson ISD

Jefferson ISD jumped up to a “B” rating this year, up from 2018’s “C” rating.

Overall, the district scored 82 out of 100, up from last year’s 75. The district rated “B” in both student achievement and school progress and rated a “C” in closing the gaps.

“I’m glad to be able to communicate the fact that our district went from a ‘C’ to a ‘B,’” Jefferson ISD Superintendent Rob Barnwell said on Thursday. “There are still many areas for us to concentrate and improve on, because education is a continuous cycle of progress, but I’d like to say thank you to our students and staff for all their hard work.”

Individually, Jefferson High School rated a “B” and Jefferson Junior High School rated a “C.” Both Jefferson Elementary School and Jefferson Primary School rated “F.”

Waskom ISD

Waskom ISD jumped to a “B” rating this year, up from last year’s “C” rating.

Overall, the district’s score improved to an 87 out of 100 this year, up from a 76 last year.

The district rated a “B” in student achievement, an “A” in school progress and a “C” in closing the gaps.

“Waskom ISD feels like we have won an academic championship,” Waskom ISD Superintendent Jimmy Cox said Thursday. “Our teachers work hard everyday to educate the whole child and improve education for every student. We are very proud of all the staff and students.”

Waskom ISD Assistant Superintendent Rae Ann Patty agreed.

“We have put systems in place, created an academic plan, and communicated that plan to all of our staff,” she said. “We supported the teachers with resources, professional development, and the other things they needed to get their job done in order to improve student achievement. It works when you run the plan and trust the process.”

Individually, all three campuses, Waskom High School, Waskom Elementary School and Waskom Middle School rated a “B.”

Karnack ISD

Karnack ISD rated a “B” this year, with an overall score of 80 out of 100. Last year, the district rated “met standard,” with an 86 score.

The district rated a “D” in student achievement, a “B” in school progress and a “C” in closing the gaps.

The district, which has one campus of pre-kindergarten through eighth grade students, had its George Washington Carver Elementary School rated as a “B.”

“We are so very proud of our accountability rating of ‘B,’” Karnack ISD Superintendent Amy Dickson said on Thursday. “Because we are a one campus district, our campus and district rating is the same. I especially love that for two consecutive years, Karnack’s highest domain has been in student growth.

“I am beyond proud of the staff, students, parents, board and community for the great things taking place in Karnack ISD,” said said. “We will continue to work diligently towards higher ratings, but more importantly, meeting the needs of each individual child in the district — whether that be academic, social, emotional, or physical. Enrollment is up, spirits are high and it’s a great day to be a Karnack Indian.”

Panola Charter

Panola Charter School Systems, which locally has the Texas Early College High School (TECHS) campus in Marshall, overall kept its rating steady at a “B,” same as in 2018.

Overall, the charter system’s score posted in at an 86 out of 100, slightly down from last year’s 88 score.

The charter system rated “B” across the board in student achievement, school progress and closing the gaps.

Individually, TECHS rated a “B,” as did Panola Charter School. Panola Early College High School rated an “A.”