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A federal jury in Marshall decided this week that KeyMe, a key duplication kiosk maker headquartered in New York, did not infringe patents belonging to competitor, The Hillman Group.

A federal jury in Marshall decided this week that KeyMe, a key duplication kiosk maker headquartered in New York, did not infringe patents belonging to competitor, The Hillman Group.

The six patents-in-suit related to self-service key duplication technology that covered the operation and management of the kiosks. According to court documents, the patents relate to “critical mechanical and electrical systems” for identifying an existing key and cutting that pattern onto a blank key, Law 360 reported.

According to the lawsuit, the plaintiff, Hillman, based in Cincinnati, Ohio, is engaged in the business of providing a variety of products and services for the retail industry, with a focus on the hardware and home improvement businesses. Hillman’s products include a variety of key duplication machines, including its FastKey, Minute Key, and KeyKrafter key duplication machines.

“On information and belief, KeyMe provides self-service key duplication kiosks to the retail industry and regularly conducts business throughout the United States, including within this judicial district, by placing these kiosks in retail locations. On information and belief, KeyMe derives revenue from the sale of the keys duplicated in the KeyMe kiosks to consumers,” the lawsuit states.

Hillman noted that KeyMe markets a self-service key duplicating kiosk that it has introduced into interstate commerce under one or more trade names, including but not limited to the “KeyMe” or “Locksmith in a Box” kiosks.

“On information and belief, KeyMe has marketed, sold, offered for sale, and/or provided the Infringing Products to various retailers throughout the United States and this judicial district, including but not limited to 7-Eleven, Bed Bath & Beyond, Rite Aid, Albertson’s, Kmart, Safeway, Sears, Mall of America, Giant Eagle, Ralphs, Kroger, Vons, and Tom Thumb, and is continuing to do so,” Hillman’s lawsuit alleged.

The jury trial began in Marshall’s federal court on April 5, and concluded on Monday, April 12, with the jury reaching a unanimous verdict, finding that KeyMe did not infringe any claims in the patents-in-suit. US District Chief Judge Rodney Gilstrap presided over the trial.

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